Wild Wisconsin Winter Web Conference - Tech Track

Wild Wisc Face Cover (1)Since 2012, January means the Wild Wisconsin Winter Web Conference. I have the honor of being a part of the team that brings this conference to life. It also means two full days hosting or co-hosting webinars on lots of topics. This year's conference, held on January 22 and 23, featured topics in four tracks: Adult Services, Tech Trends, Library Management, and Small & Mighty. 

For this post, I want to tell you about the Tech Trends webinars. First up was Leah Gentry from the Menomonee Falls Public Library talking about how to Help Your Patrons Cut the Cable Cord. This is the third time I've seen Leah present this topic and I learn something new every time. If you're at all interested in learning more about Rokus, Netflix, Hulu, SlingTV, and more, check out this webinar. (Slides, Recording)

Next up was Laura Solomon from the Ohio Public Library Information Network presenting an "Introduction to Website Accessibility." If Laura's name sounds familiar, you're right. Laura has presented for Wild Wisconsin in past years and also at Tech Days a couple of years ago. She really knows her material and is an enthusiastic presenter. I learned a lot about why accessibility is important in the online world - something I hadn't thought much about before. (Slides, Recording)

And, the final session in the Tech Trends track was Kimberly Crowder teaching us how to "Level Up on Your Social Media Trends 2020." While I learned a lot in this session, I don't think I'll be signing up for Tiktok anytime soon! I believe there will be some future TechBits posts from ideas in this session, too. (Slides, Recording)

Have topics you'd like to see at Wild Wisconsin 2021? Let me know - we're always looking for new topics and ideas.

 

 

Digital Bytes: MailChimp, scheduling Facebook posts

Ever wonder about using MailChimp for newsletters?  This recent Digital Byte video from Wisconsin Valley Library Service is all about MailChimp and how your library can use it for marketing efforts.

 

Jamie also posted a quick video about how to schedule posts for your library's Facebook page from your mobile device:

You can find all the WVLS Digital Bytes here: https://wvls.org/digital-bytes/

Instagram Shopping Collection Feature…just in time for the holidays!

Instagram-icon
You’ve probably noticed a lot more advertisements appearing on your Instagram feed as the holiday season is rapidly approaching.  In November, Instagram released some new features for users to interact with these posts.  The most notable of these features is the ability to “save” products to a personal “Shopping Collection.”

When users click on a product tag in stories or on their feed, they will now see an option to save the product to a separate list.  Users can now create a wishlist on Instagram that takes them right to a product when they are ready to purchase it. 

You can add an item to your Shopping Collection by clicking on the icon:

Inkedimage004_LI


You can access your Shopping Collection by going to your profile and selecting it from the Saved Collections on your profile.

Image005

Unfortunately, there is currently no way to share your Shopping Collection with another IG User or export the information.  After doing some research, it seems users are asking for this ability already.  Hopefully, IG will work on making this feature even better!   

Happy Holidays and Happy Shopping!

What are you talking about?

Being one of two millennials working in this office, I find myself in conversations frequently about differences between the generations.  Someone will make a reference about licking a postage stamp and I reply with "That's cray".  This has led a co-worker to show me The Mindset List.  Created at Beloit College in 1998 as a way for college professors to understand the "mindset" of incoming students, it has been eye-opening for myself. 

A list has been created each year since 2002 and features 50+ items that young adults entering college that year know or don't know.  The lists can be used with adults today to better understand the differences in generations.  I think they would especially be helpful for libraries to not only understand their patrons but also potential job candidates.  The authors have also written two https://www.classy.org/blog/infographic-generational-giving/
books (both of which are available in LINKcat) and frequently present the information as well.  

The most recent list has some new slang, and I'll be honest that even I don't know what most of it means.  Take a look at the lists and I think you will find them interesting as well.

Using the Places Tab Search in Instagram

Places_tab

The Places tab is an often underutilized part of Instagram’s Search and Explore page. When you search for places, Instagram will feature the nine highest ranking posts in that location, followed by the most recent posts in chronological order.  This is a great way to engage with what’s happening in your local area. I found this very useful when we had local flooding recently.  It helped us find out what resources were available in our community to help with cleanup and local volunteer opportunities.

How to search Places:

  • Go to the magnifying glass icon at the bottom of your profile.
  • Search for the Places Tab (to the right).
  • Select your desired location from the list.

From a posting perspective, remember to use the Places tag feature on your posts.  You may find you engage your local audience more and potentially gain new followers.

 

Wikipedia and Libraries

Image-1I love Wikipedia and probably use it daily to find answers to questions like "How many seasons of the show the Librarians are there?" Yet, as a librarian I feel like I can't fully trust it. Well, guess what? OCLC developed a training program that helps librarians learn to use Wikipedia more effectively and, better yet, trains them to edit Wikipedia entries. The materials were originally developed for a nine-week WebJunction course, and now they are available for all libraries to use.

https://www.webjunction.org/explore-topics/wikipedia-libraries/training-curriculum.html

Wikipedia + Librarians, because librarians ROCK!

 

 

Instagram Stories are now being archived

Instagram-iconI am fairly new to Instagram and have just started playing around with the Story feature.  This feature seems to be very popular with my teenage daughter and her friends.  Stories are a way to share things with your followers on a temporary basis (the story will disappear after 24 hours). I can see the appeal, but being in the library world, I tend to want to save any and all information.

Thankfully, Instagram now automatically saves all your stories for you in Archive. It also added a place to show them off in your profile called Highlight.  Go to your profile and click on Edit Profile.  Then select the Archive tab. You can then select a Story to view it or share it again. You'll also see an option that says Highlight; select it to have that Story appear in an area just under your profile.

General Data Protection Regulation law - what?

Europe's General Data Protection Regulation law goes into effect May 25, 2018.  The definition from Wikipedia is "The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (EU) 2016/679 is a regulation in EU law on data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union and the European Economic Area. It also addresses the export of personal data outside the EU and EEA.

This law has been seven years in the making and, in light of other recent news about data privacy infringement, seems to be very timely.  If companies and websites that you may use have a global presence (like Google), you are probably seeing an increase in "required" information bits about how that company or website is protecting your privacy and/or changes you should make to your account to increase the protection of your personal data.  

Here's a link to an article in The Guardian (UK) that I was reading in my last copy of American Libraries Direct.

And an article from The New York Times May 6, 2018 

Enjoy! Heidi O.

Using Instagram Photo Editing and Filters without posting the photo online

Instagram-icon

I have tried a lot of apps for editing photos.  I found Instagram very easy to use and liked the variety in filtering options.  I wanted a way to save the edited photos without having to post all of them to my account.  After some research, I found a clever way to do this.

Here’s How:

  1. Open Instagram and visit your profile
  2. Tap the gear icon on iOS (or the three dots on Android) to go to Options
  3. Scroll down and toggle on Save Original Photos
  4. Turn on Airplane Mode on your device
  5. Open the photo in Instagram and edit as usual
  6. Once you’ve finished, skip adding a caption or other info and tap Share
  7. The post will fail (because you have turned on airplane mode)
  8. You will get a failed notification that you may close out of
  9. The photo will now be saved to your camera roll
  10. Turn off Airplane Mode and use the photo however you like

Instagram for libraries

InstagramInstagram is a popular smartphone app for sharing photos and videos. LifeWire describes it as being "like a simplified version of Facebook, with an emphasis on mobile use and visual sharing. Just like other social networks, you can interact with other users on Instagram by following them, being followed by them, commenting, liking, tagging and private messaging. You can even save the photos you see on Instagram."

Want to learn more about how to use it? Take a peek at the GCFlearnfree.org tutorial.

Considering Instagram for your library? Already on Instagram but curious what other libraries are doing? Here are some links to get you thinking!