« December 2018 | Main

Let's go phishing

Can you spot a scam? Here are a couple of short phishing quizzes to test your skills:

Phishing

 

How did you do?

Looking for tips to improve your skills?  These webpages have some helpful suggestions about what to look for!

 

 

Upcoming Snipping Tool Change

Microsoft is changing the name and functionality of the Snipping Tool for Windows 10 in an upcoming update.  I use the Snipping Tool regularly to include screenshots in documentation.  After the 1809 Feature Update was installed on my laptop, I noticed a warning the first time I opened the Snipping Tool.  The warning basically states that the tool is moving, it will have improved features, and it will be called "Snip & Sketch." 

Snipping Tool Change

Microsoft hasn't announced when the new version will be forced or what update will make the change permanent.  After you get the 1809 Feature Update, you can still use the tool in its basic form.  You can also click "Try Snip & Sketch" to start using the new features.

  • The first thing I notice with the new version is that the toolbar has the modern Windows Store app design.
    Toolbar
  • When saving a snip, the default name of the file will include the date and time stamp.
  • You may configure the Print Screen button on your keyboard to open Snip & Sketch directly.
  • A ruler allows you to draw straight lines on your snip.  The angle of the ruler can be adjusted with your mouse's scroll wheel.
    Ruler
  • A protractor is available for help drawing circles.
  • Drawing and markup tools are improved.

More information about this change.

More information about all changes with the 1809 Feature Update.

 

Favorites Toolbar

Bookmark toolbarLast fall I was working with a very smiley colleague on a large order when she noticed that I use folders on my web browsers favorites’ toolbar to group similar links. After I showed her how I created the folders we talked about how this might be something worth sharing with our readers.

For those that didn’t know Favorites Toolbars existed, I have to tell you, it’s incredibly convenient to have a few of my go-to favorites at the top of my browser where I can quickly go without having to click on dropdown menus. I found it frustrating when I had so many bookmarks in my toolbar that it became cluttered, which is where using folders to combine similar links can come in to help organize your toolbar.  For instance, I drive a lot, so I have a folder with my favorite travel advisory links so that I can quickly see if I should expect any travel delays. I also have a folder with a lot of Google doc links.

I mostly use Google Chrome and Firefox browsers, but you can also do this with Edge.

In Google Chrome, click the Customize and Control button (3 vertical dots) in the upper right hand corner. Hover your cursor over Bookmarks and select Show bookmarks bar. This will add the bookmarks bar if you don’t already have it. If you right-click in the bookmarks bar you will have an option to add a folder. Once you add and name a folder you can drag links into it.

In Firefox, click the menu button (Cheeseburger or 3 vertical lines) in the upper right-hand corner and choose Customize, click the Toolbars button at the bottom of the screen and select Bookmarks Toolbar. Just like with Chrome you can right-click in the bookmarks bar you will have an option to add a folder. Once you add and name a folder you can drag links into it.

I’ve also found that by having a visual of my favorite websites on my bookmarks toolbar I use them way more than I used my bookmarks menu at the top of my browser.

Digital Byte: Top Tech Tools

Did you catch Jamie's most recent Digital Byte video? In it, she talks about her 8 favorite tech tools at the moment and how they might help you in your library work. The video is only 6 minutes and covers 8 tools (Slack, Screencast-O-Matic, Noisli, Pixabay, CamScanner, LunaPic, iMovie, and BeFunky).

You can find more of the WVLS Digital Bytes here: https://wvls.org/digital-bytes/

USB Who?

We recently have been ordering new models of PCs and I noticed some brand new USB ports on the front.  In the past there has only been two different types with one being a super speed: USB 2.0 and USB 3.0.  But recently I have been seeing new symbols next to the USB ports.  I was curious so to Google I went. 

Port A is a regular USB 2.0 and supports all devices with the same connection.  This is the standard and most common USB type.  Port B is a new type of port called USB PowerShare which allows you to charge small devices like a smartphone while the PC is off.  Normally when you turn the PC off, the USB ports are off as well.  PowerShare allows the port to receive a small amount of power still. IMG_4335

Port C is a USB 3.0 or super speed that allows a fast transfer of files and data.  This is helpful when you are copying a large amount of data to and from a flash drive or using your phone's fast charge feature.  You can tell when a port is 3.0 v.s 2.0 by the "ss" next to the symbol or the internal connection is blue.  Port D is a USB-C port which is a newer, super speed, universal connector which allows the transfer of video or power.  While a lot of devices do not have this yet I do have a hard drive that does, so it is becoming more popular.

Who knew there would be this many different USB ports!

Technology straight out of Science Fiction

Today I received an invitation to a readers advisory webinar titled "Why Read Science Fiction and How to Help Those Who Do".  I deleted it because a) I don't work with the public and b) I know why to read science fiction and people would like to find a way to prevent me from telling them what science fiction stories to read and which science fiction authors to read and and ...

Ahem.  While working away at my desk and thinking about what to write for this inaugural 2019 Tech Bits post, I thought "Where's my flying car?"  As an elementary school child in the mid-to-late 1960's I was thrilled by the promise that when I became an adult, I would be zipping around in my own private, flying car.  Just like on the Jetsons.

So ... where's my flying car?

Sadly (or perhaps happily for the local geese population) single-passenger electric aircraft are only just this year getting off the ground for consumers.  Pun intended.  And it is unlikely that I will win a lottery and have enough money to purchase one of these babies ($$$$$!!!!!)  But, to get back to the beginning of this ramble, flying cars are not the only technology that has manifested out of science fiction books, television programs and movies too, for that matter. 

What, don't you think your old flip-top phone bore a marked resemblance to the communicators on Start Trek?  Just sayin' ...

Courtesy of Electric Lit, here are the "8 pieces of Modern Technology That Science Fiction Predicted -- Or Invented.

1888: Credit Cards - Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward

1911: Video calling - Hugo Gernsback’s Ralph 124C 41+

1931: Mood-Enhancing Pills - Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

1939: Surveillance - George Orwell’s 1984

1968: Tablets - Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001: A Space Odyssey

1969: Electric Cars - John Brunner’s Stand On Zanzibar

1972: Bionic Limbs - Martin Caidin’s Cyborg (aka TV’s The Six Million Dollar Man)

1984: The World Wide Web - William Gibson’s Neuromancer

The next time you are offering readers advisory, offer your patrons some titles that will allow them to glimpse the future.  Or help create it.

Other online articles 

13 Everyday Technologies That Were First Imagined In Science Fiction

10 Great Technologies We Got From Science Fiction

The 5 Coolest Technologies from Hard Science Fiction