Instagram Stories are now being archived

Instagram-iconI am fairly new to Instagram and have just started playing around with the Story feature.  This feature seems to be very popular with my teenage daughter and her friends.  Stories are a way to share things with your followers on a temporary basis (the story will disappear after 24 hours). I can see the appeal, but being in the library world, I tend to want to save any and all information.

Thankfully, Instagram now automatically saves all your stories for you in Archive. It also added a place to show them off in your profile called Highlight.  Go to your profile and click on Edit Profile.  Then select the Archive tab. You can then select a Story to view it or share it again. You'll also see an option that says Highlight; select it to have that Story appear in an area just under your profile.

General Data Protection Regulation law - what?

Europe's General Data Protection Regulation law goes into effect May 25, 2018.  The definition from Wikipedia is "The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (EU) 2016/679 is a regulation in EU law on data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union and the European Economic Area. It also addresses the export of personal data outside the EU and EEA.

This law has been seven years in the making and, in light of other recent news about data privacy infringement, seems to be very timely.  If companies and websites that you may use have a global presence (like Google), you are probably seeing an increase in "required" information bits about how that company or website is protecting your privacy and/or changes you should make to your account to increase the protection of your personal data.  

Here's a link to an article in The Guardian (UK) that I was reading in my last copy of American Libraries Direct.

And an article from The New York Times May 6, 2018 

Enjoy! Heidi O.

Using Instagram Photo Editing and Filters without posting the photo online

Instagram-icon

I have tried a lot of apps for editing photos.  I found Instagram very easy to use and liked the variety in filtering options.  I wanted a way to save the edited photos without having to post all of them to my account.  After some research, I found a clever way to do this.

Here’s How:

  1. Open Instagram and visit your profile
  2. Tap the gear icon on iOS (or the three dots on Android) to go to Options
  3. Scroll down and toggle on Save Original Photos
  4. Turn on Airplane Mode on your device
  5. Open the photo in Instagram and edit as usual
  6. Once you’ve finished, skip adding a caption or other info and tap Share
  7. The post will fail (because you have turned on airplane mode)
  8. You will get a failed notification that you may close out of
  9. The photo will now be saved to your camera roll
  10. Turn off Airplane Mode and use the photo however you like

Instagram for libraries

InstagramInstagram is a popular smartphone app for sharing photos and videos. LifeWire describes it as being "like a simplified version of Facebook, with an emphasis on mobile use and visual sharing. Just like other social networks, you can interact with other users on Instagram by following them, being followed by them, commenting, liking, tagging and private messaging. You can even save the photos you see on Instagram."

Want to learn more about how to use it? Take a peek at the GCFlearnfree.org tutorial.

Considering Instagram for your library? Already on Instagram but curious what other libraries are doing? Here are some links to get you thinking!

Do your ads on Facebook ever seem a little off?

Facebook

Have you ever asked yourself why is there an ad in my newsfeed suggesting a product that I would never buy?  I started getting ads for things I really wasn't interested in without knowing the cause.  You may not know this, but liking certain things on Facebook can cause the ads that display in your news feed to change. 

What would be ideal is an option to turn off ads altogether.  However, Facebook's business is based on providing marketers with detailed information on its users' interests.  Facebook primarily bases this information on what users’ follow. However, if you "like" something on Facebook that's a little out of your normal interests, you may start seeing unwanted ads. 

You do have the ability to alter your ad experience by following several steps.  First, go to Settings > Ads > click "Your Interests." You can delete an interest by hitting delete on the right of each interest. Also, under the "Advertisers you've interacted with" tab, you'll see all the advertisers whose ads you've clicked on and/or provided your information.  Here you'll also have the ability to delete entries from your ad-interaction information. Under the "whose ads you've clicked" sub-tab, you can even choose to stop seeing ads from a particular advertiser altogether. Hope this helps to make your Facebook ad experience more pleasant.

Bitmoji - Turn yourself into an emoji

Intro:    Hello!  This is Emily; I'm the new kid at SCLS working as a computer technician along side Craig.  I graduated Madison College in December 2016 and started at SCLS shortly after.  When I'm not installing and imaging PCs I enjoy annoying Craig, reading, shopping, and spending time with my animals.  I have 2 dogs (Ellie and Luna) and 2 cats (Bud and Weiser, yes that is really their names).  I also just recently became engaged to my boyfriend of almost 4 years.  Okay, that's enough about me for now :)

    Are you looking for a fun way to represent yourself at the library and in your personal life?  Then you should download the Bitmoji app from the Google Play Store or App Store.  This fun app allows you to create a caricature (or emoji) of yourself that you can post to social media, send to friends and colleagues via text or email, or use theMeowm creatively in the library.

    The app itself is easy enough to use and walks you through every part of creating your face.  From choosing your jaw line to eye shape and color to hair style and ears, you can create a pretty accurate character with your features.  After choosing your facial features, you can choose an outfit that best represents your style.  Next you will see hundreds of different poses, phrases, and actions your bitmoji can do.  You can express different feelings, holidays, sports, or actions  They do not move and are more like a sticker you can paste places.

    You can create a bitmoji of yourself for your Twitter profile picture, Office 365 profile picture, or a Facebook post wishing everyone a good holiday.  Think of how fun it would be to have all staff at your library create their own character then print it out and place it on their name tag or desk plate.  You could also use it in your personal life in Snapchat, text, Facebook messenger or save as an image.  

    Bitmoji is a fun app and tool to represent yourself in a fun way without using a real photo.  Download it and try it out!

    I have created my own character below as well as another SCLS staff member.  Can you guess who?  

 

Meow MeowThumbs up for plaidGoals: Wear leopard print more oftenThe daily grind"I love my job!"


Emoji blitz

Emojis4 (2)While I was traveling to ALA Midwinter, I was browsing through the Delta Sky Magazine and came across an article on how emojis are born. Being the standards-loving librarian that I am, I was fascinated to learn that emojis are approved by the Unicode Consortium and each one is assigned a unique code. This is what makes all emojis appear the same on all the different devices. Fascinating! Now I know why I am able to send my friends the emojis I win in the Disney Emoji Blitz game that I play. 

Since emojis are so ubiquitous, the article got me thinking about emojis and libraries. There is not a lot out there, but I did find this article in Library Journal that talks about library emoji (or the lack thereof). What would your library look like as an emoj?

 

Downloading your Facebook account data

Note: Pat first wrote about this topic in 2010. Some things have changed since then, so I'm writing an updated post. 


I'm thinking about cleaning up some of my Facebook data (remove old photos, posts, etc.). Although I'm pretty sure that any photos I have posted on Facebook are also backed up somewhere else, I want to be sure that I don't lose anything. After some Googling, I discovered that you can download the data from your Facebook account.

To get started, click on the arrow in the upper right-hand corner of the screen and choose Settings.

Fb-bluebar

From your General Account Settings page, click General on the left side of the screen.

Fb-generalaccount

At the bottom of the General Account Settings, click on the Download a copy of your Facebook data link.

Fb-download

A new screen will appear. Click the green Start my Archive button. You will get a pop-up noting that it will take a little while to gather the archive data. Follow the prompts to continue - clicking another Start my Archive button and entering your password. You will get a confirmation message pop-up when this is complete.

Fb-startarchive

Check the email account for the email address associated with your Facebook account. You will receive an email from Facebook stating that a download has been requested. You will get a second email when the download is ready. For me, the second email came one minute after the first email, but my Facebook account is not that large (not that many photos and no videos).

To download the data, click on the link from the second email stating that your download is ready. (Note that you can also go back into your account and click the Download a copy of your Facebook data link.) A new screen will appear. Click the green Download Archive button. You will get a pop-up asking you to re-enter your password. 

Fb-downloadarchive

After you have re-entered your password, the archive will download as a .zip file. Save the file on your computer and unzip the file to access the contents. Keep in mind that your Facebook data is private information. For more information on what information is included in your Facebook archive, see the Accessing your Facebook data help page

You will be able to download your archive for a few days after you receive the email with the archive link. I was able to download my archive three days later but Facebook does not state exactly how long it keeps the archive available. If your download link has expired, you can start the process over to generate a new archive.

The downloaded archive can be challenging to navigate. The index.htm file is a good place to start (you can open this file with a web browser). For some additional information on navigating the archive files, see http://www.idownloadblog.com/2016/01/18/how-to-download-facebook-archive/

Snapchat

SnapchatHave you used Snapchat? Pictures, short videos, captions, and filters for fun/silly pictures make it great for keeping in touch with friends and family.  It's especially helpful for keeping up with a teenager I know who isn't so keen on TALKING, but who is very willing to send me quick snaps of her pets and recent activities. 

As a slightly-older-than-teenager adult, Snapchat was not intuitive to me. I had to have a lesson from the silent teenager's older sister, but how glad am I that I did -- it's a fun little program!

In August, I told you about TechBoomers.com, a free educational website that teaches people how to use popular websites and apps. This recent TechSoup for Libraries post discusses using TechBoomers as resource for library staff and patrons to quickly learn how to use things like Snapchat, Vine*, Pinterest, and Instagram. The full list of TechBoomers' social media courses can be found here. All of the TechBoomers content is Creative Commons licensed, and you are free to reuse it in your own technology training for patrons or staff.
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*Did you hear the news? Twitter has announced it will be shutting down Vine in upcoming months.

TechSoup for Libraries

TechSoup for LibrariesDo you know about the TechSoup for Libraries blog? It's one of my favorites!

TechSoup for Libraries is a project of TechSoup, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit devoted to making technology and technology education available and affordable to nonprofits and libraries all over the world. TechSoup for Libraries continues to gather and share stories from the field so libraries can keep learning from each other.

I was just looking over the blog recently and was amazed all over again at what a helpful collection of topics it covers. Some recent examples:

And those are just some of the posts that I find most appealing given my interests! There are many, many more posts on a variety of library technology topics.

You can browse to the blog, sign up for their monthly newsletters, follow them via RSS, or follow them on Twitter.